Most Popular Tourist Attractions In The World

Turkey: Gobeklitepe The Oldest Temple of the World

There are substantial grounds to claim that the most significant archaeological discovery of the 21st century is the Göbeklitepe. First of all, it dates back to 12 thousand years ago. In other words, it’s approximately 8 thousand years older than the pyramids and 7 thousand years older than the Stonehenge. Furthermore, it is even older than the human transition to settled life. Therefore, contrary to the widely held view, it proves the existence of religious beliefs prior to the establishment of the first cities.

Turkey Hagia Sophia

Hagia Sophia is considered a unique monument in world architecture, and its magnificence and functionality has been a good example in construction of countless Ottoman mosques. (AyaSofya Mosque, Ayasofya Cami)

Turkey:

Cappadocia which is unique in the world and is a miraculous nature wonder is the common name of the field covered by the provinces of Aksaray, Nevsehir, Nigde, Kayseri and Kirsehir in the Central Anatolian region.

In the upper Myosen period in the Cappadocia region as a result of the vulcanic eruptions occurred in Erciyes, Hasandag and Gulludag, in the region was formed a large tableland from the vulcanic tufas and together with the erosion of the Kizilirmak river and wind over ten thousands of years there appeared the chimney rocks which are a wonder of the nature. In the old Bronze Age the Cappadocia which was the population zone of the Assyrian civilization later has hosted the Hittite, Frig, Pers, Byzantine, Seljuk and Ottoman civilizations. The first Christians escaped from the persecution of the Roman Empire in the 2nd century B.C. came to the Cappadocia over the Antakya and Kayseri and they have settled here. The first Christians finding the underground cities from Cappadocia have been hidden in these underground cities which gates were made in such way in which they couldn’t be easily observed and they have escaped from the persecution of the Roman soldiers. Due that they had live in the underground cities for long duration without being able to go out they have developed these underground cities by making provisions rooms, ventilation chimneys, wine production places, churches, abbeys, water wells, toilets and meeting rooms.In the prehistoric periods the first human settlements have begun and the humans have constructed the underground cities in the volcanic rocks in form of tufa due to protect themselves from the wild animals and they lived for long times in these underground cities. There are so many underground cities on the Cappadocia area of Turkey but the biggest is Derinkuyu Underground City.In these cities made in form of rooms connected to each others some of the rooms were connected to each other only with the tunnels tight and permitting passing of just a person. At the access gates of these tunnels there were huge stone rollers used for closing the tunnels for security reasons.

Turkey: Sumela Monastery

The ruins of a monastery can be seen on the slopes of the Zigana Mountains to the south of Trabzon and at the foot of the mountain at the bottom of a wooded valley flows one of the tributaries of Değirmen Creek, which terminates at Trabzon. This place is known as “Meryem Ana”, or “the Virgin Mary” by the local people. Its old name is “Sumela Monastery”. Many people consider its origins to be extremely old, and this opinion is widely held among the Byzantine Greek community of the Black Sea coast. According to legends about the foundation of the monastery in books about Trabzon printed in Greek, the monastery was originally founded in the reign of Theodosius and rebuilt in the sixth century in the reign of Justinian by Belisarios, one of his commanders. However, foreign experts who have conducted on-site investigations consider that there is nothing to substantiate this hypothesis. The Monastery’s main source of income is an icon of the Virgin Mary, which is reputed to be of great age and believed by many to possess miraculous properties. According to the legend, the icon is the work of Saint Luke, one of the disciples of Jesus Christ and it was sent to Athens after the death of Luke. However, in the reign of Theodosius (4th century) the icon declared its desire to leave Athens and was borne to this hollow in the mountains around Trabzon by angels and placed upon a stone. It was at that time that two hermits by the name of Barnabus and Sophronius, who were then travelling from Athens to Trabzon, happened to find the icon in this deserted spot. Thus, buildings which are the subject of such legends are automatically regarded as being exceptionally old. Sumela is not the only example of this type, it is only one of a number.

Turkey: The Cotton Castle Pamukkale

Pamukkale in Aegean Turkey is also called the “Cotton Castle”, because of the white, cottony appearance of the mineral bath spas that abound the province, which is rich in calcium. Known as a “spa town” since the Roman era, tourists travel to Pamukkale to relax in warm, soothing and therapeutic waters in the myriad spas.

Pamukkale is a small place, but it has remarkable spots to make your trip memorable such as the ruins of Hierapolis (ancient spa town), Sacred Pool (scattered marble columns add to the charm of this warm, calcium-dense pool), Travertines (calcium deposit terraces), Roman Theater and the archaeological Museum.

Many years ago, Greeks and Romans discovered the curative properties of the warm mineral springs that are found in Pamukkale. Predictably, these springs attracted droves of tourists to the place, but not only to seek therapeutic comforts, but also to see the magnificence of the hardened calcium bicarbonate cascading over the cliffs.Known as the Cotton Cliffs, it is a famous and stunning calcium structure that earned a UNESCO World Heritage Site title in the 1970s.

: the Great Wall of China

At over 13,000 miles long, the Great Wall of China is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and was voted one of the New Seven Wonders of the World in 2007. The Mutianyu section of the Great Wall is the most popular with tourists, just two hours outside Beijing.

India: the Taj Mahal

The Taj Mahal was built by the emperor Shah Jahan between 1631 and 1648. UNESCO calls it “the greatest architectural achievement in the whole range of Indo-Islamic architecture.”

France: the

No trip to France is complete without visiting the iconic Eiffel Tower, which was completed in 1889 and stands at 1,063 feet tall.

Canada: Niagara Falls

With about 30 million visitors a year, Niagara Falls is one of the most popular waterfalls in the world.

Thailand:

Patong Beach is arguably the most famous (and stunning) of Phuket’s beach resorts.

Brazil: Christ the Redeemer,

The 98-foot-tall statue in Tijuca Forest National Park can be seen for miles and is one of the new seven wonders of the world.

Cuba:

Old Havana was founded around 1519. It has five plazas serving as historical city centers with Baroque and neoclassical architecture and is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

United Arab Emirates: Burj Khalifa

Burj Khalifa in Dubai holds seven world records, including the tallest building in the world, at 2,716 feet tall.

Egypt: the Great Sphinx

The Great Sphinx with the face of the ancient Egyptian King Khafre is 240 feet long and 66 feet high.

Japan:

Climbing all 12,388 feet of Mount Fuji isn’t for the faint of heart, but it’s doable to reach the summit in a day or two.

United Kingdom: Buckingham Palace

Buckingham Palace
Crowds outside Buckingham Palace in London. Rob Stothard/Getty Images

Buckingham Palace is the British monarchy’s administrative headquarters with a total of 775 rooms. Tourists who time their visits right can witness the Changing of the Guard ceremony, and may even catch a glimpse of a member of the royal family.

Australia: Sydney Opera House

This symbol of the Sydney Harbor and UNESCO World Heritage Site opened in 1973 and remains one of the most recognizable buildings in the world.

Greece: the

Parthenon temple on a sunset with pink and purple clouds. Acropolis in Athens, Greece – Image
The Parthenon temple, part of the Acropolis in Athens, Greece. Shutterstock

Built in the 5th century BCE for the goddess Athena, much of the white marble basic structure has remained.

Bolivia: Salar de Uyuni salt flat

The world’s largest salt flat makes for some amusing photo opportunities that play with perspective.

Spain: La Sagrada Família

Construction on the ornate temple began in 1882 and still isn’t finished (the expected completion date is 2026). Over 4.5 million people visit the cathedral each year.

Iceland: Blue Lagoon

Contrary to popular belief, the Blue Lagoon isn’t a naturally-occurring phenomenon. It’s made from a nearby geothermal power plant’s discharge.

Argentina: , Buenos Aires

La Boca’s colorful buildings and cobblestone streets complete with a lively arts scene make this district one of the most visited (and most photogenic) in Buenos Aires.

Mexico: Chichen-Itza

This ancient Mayan settlement dates back to the 400s and was abandoned in the 15th century. Thousands of people visit its remains each day.

New Zealand: Hobbiton

Fans of “The Lord of the Rings” can visit Middle Earth in the form of Hobbiton, the movie set used to film scenes in the Shire for the “Lord of the Rings” movies.

Croatia: Dubrovnik Old Town

The Dubrovnik Old Town is one of the most well-preserved medieval cities in the world with enormous walls dating back to the 11th century.

Vietnam: Ba Na Hill mountain resort

Ba Na Hill’s attractions include cable cars through the mountains, the Golden Bridge held up by enormous stone hands, and theme park rides.

Zambia:

At the border of Zambia and Zimbabwe lies Victoria Falls, a 354-foot waterfall that has been called “the greatest curtain of falling water in the world.”

Morocco: Hassan II Mosque

The Hasan II Mosque is the largest mosque in Africa and has the tallest minaret in the world at 700 feet tall. It was built in 1993.

United States: Disney World

Disney World is one of the most popular tourist sites in the US with over 17 million visitors every year.

: Anne Frank House

Anne Frank’s diary chronicling her life before World War II, her years hiding from the Nazis, and her musings as a young woman became world famous after the war. Visiting the Anne Frank House in Amsterdam where her family hid in a secret annex requires a reservation months in advance.

Italy: Leaning Tower of Pisa

It’s nearly impossible to resist the optical illusion photo-ops that the leaning tower of Pisa provides. Construction on the building began in 1173, and it currently leans about four degrees.

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